War Powers and Military Force

February 8, 2018 - 5:15 pm

Please join the Atlantic Council for an event on the topic of war powers and military force on February 8, 5:15 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. The event will take place at the Atlantic Council HQ (1030 15th Street NW, 12th Floor, Washington, DC 20005) and will be followed by a reception (6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.).
 
In an age of unprecedented disruption and escalating inter- and intrastate conflict, we have seen a surge in the need for nations to resort to military force. As one of the most consequential decisions for a nation to undertake—with enormous consequences to a country’s security, prosperity, and global standing—the gravity of such decisions cannot be understated.
 
Please join Nuchhi Currier, Bruce Fein, and John Yoo, three of the world’s most renowned experts on the issue of war powers, as they dissect this topic of immense geopolitical importance.
 
Nuchhi Currier, a Pakistani-born writer and consultant, holds a master’s degree in international affairs from New York’s Columbia University.  She has twice served as president of the Washington-based Woman’s National Democratic Club in recent years, and is the latest entrant into the 2018 race for the House of Delegates from District 16 in Montgomery County. 

A trenchant scholar, Bruce Fein, was associate deputy attorney general and general counsel to the Federal Communications Commission under President Ronald Reagan. He served as research director for Republicans on the Joint Congressional Committee on Covert Arms Sales to Iran, and on the American Bar Association's Committee on Presidential Signing Statements.

A professor at Berkeley’s Law Faculty, John Yoo is the co-director of the Korea Law Center and also acts as faculty director for the California Constitution Center and the Program in Public Law and Governance. He served as general counsel of the US Senate Judiciary Committee from 1995-96. From 2001 to 2003, he served as a deputy assistant attorney general in the Office of Legal Counsel at the US Department of Justice, where he worked on issues involving foreign affairs, national security and the separation of powers.
 
We hope you can join us for what promises to be a fascinating and timely conversation. 



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