July 14, 2015
It's no coincidence that Kenya will host this year's Global Entrepreneurship Summit in July, or that President Barack Obama will be there in person, as well as traveling next door to Ethiopia. Home to entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and artists who embody the spirit of innovation, Africa is rapidly commanding more influence on the global stage. The United States, and indeed the world, has taken notice.

A new book, The Next Africa: An Emerging Continent Becomes a Global Powerhouse, by Africa Center Visiting Fellow Aubrey Hruby and coauthor Jake Bright, captures this story.


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Bright and Hruby detail the cross-cutting trends prompting Silicon Valley venture capital funds and firms like GE, IBM, and Proctor & Gamble to make major investments in African economies, while describing how Africans are stimulating Milan runways, Hollywood studios, and London pop charts.

The Next Africa introduces readers to the continent's burgeoning technology movement, rising entrepreneurs, groundbreaking philanthropists, and cultural innovators making an impact in music, fashion, and film.

The Next Africa describes a future of a more globally-connected Africa where its leaders and citizens wield significant economic, cultural, and political power--a future in which Americans will be more likely to own African stocks, work for companies doing business in Africa, buy African hits from iTunes, see Nigerian actors win Oscars, and learn new African names connected to tech moguls and billionaires.





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