March 28, 2018
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“[The] political regime in Russia is transforming from a personalist authoritarian regime, with a leader on top and running the show, toward a corporatist type of regime,” writes the New Times editor-in-chief, Dr. Yevgenia Albats, in “The Direction of Russian Politics and the Putin Factor,” a new issue brief by the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center. For the first time, the political police have become power itself, its essence and its being. Stability is guaranteed by political-police operatives, technocrats in the bureaucracy, and violence as the primary method of governance. This transformation of the regime in Russia, and Putin’s dependence on former KGB operatives, will define Russia’s internal and external policies for the coming six years. However, the consolidation of the regime will also face obstacles, resulting from the different business interests within the ruling clan. This issue brief explores the nature of the regime in Russia, its key players, strengths and weaknesses, and the rules of the game that exist in Moscow.

 


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