Borzou Daragahi

Nonresident Senior Fellow, Middle East Security Initiative, Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security, Atlantic Council

Borzou Daragahi

Expert Connect

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Expertise

Topics

Arab transitions, GCC, Iran Nuclear Program, Middle East Security, Religious extremism, Syrian Conflict, Violent Extremism

Regions

Egypt, Gulf, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Levant, Libya, North Africa, Syria, Turkey

Languages

Arabic, German, Persian, Spanish




Read Full Bio





Recent Activity

  • April 09, 2019
    The administration of President Donald Trump finally on April 8—countering the advice of the United States’ own military and intelligence mandarins—named Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) a terrorist organization.As the White House bragged in its statement, it was the
  • April 05, 2019
    For decades, Algeria was the staid, stolid giant of north Africa. With powerful and well-equipped armed forces, it has been a reliable security partner for the United States in fighting against Islamic extremist groups.
  • March 30, 2019
    Iranian authorities barred international journalists from covering the disastrous floods that have stricken most of the country’s provinces and caused death and mayhem during the normally festive two-week Nowruz holidays that follow the Iranian new year. Not even the smattering
  • March 15, 2019
    As far as photographs go, it’s a rather inartful moment. Three aging men dressed in dark clothes sit in a spartan room with small glasses of heavily-brewed tea and a tissue box resting before them, as they engage in conversation.
  • February 25, 2019
    Jared Kushner, senior adviser to the US President Donald Trump, is on his way to six countries in the Gulf states to discuss and present part of his long awaited Israel-Palestine peace process plan in private meetings with foreign diplomats.
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Full Bio

Borzou Daragahi is a journalist and a nonresident senior fellow with the Middle East Security Initiative at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security.

He is a foreign correspondent who has been covering the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe for more than sixteen years. He is now based in Istanbul, writing for Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, and The Daily Beast, among others.

He previously wrote for BuzzFeed News, the Financial Times and the Los Angeles Times, and has contributed to The New York Times, Boston Globe, Daily Star of Lebanon, and dozens of other English-language print, digital, and broadcast outlets.

Borzou covered the 2003 US invasion of Iraq as well as its build-up and lengthy aftermath. He covered the 2006 war in Lebanon, the 2008 war in Georgia, the 2009 uprising in Iran, the chaotic consequences of the 2011 Arab Spring uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, and Syria, and the 2014 rise of the Islamic State and subsequent wars to defeat it. He has also reported in Afghanistan and in Europe, covering political and security issues in Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Cyprus. He has also covered the lengthy standoff over the Iran’s nuclear program.

He has been a Pulitzer Prize finalist three times, once for coverage of Iran and twice for Iraq, and has won an Overseas Press Club award and citation for Iraq and Iran coverage. He has been honored with journalism awards from the American Academy of Diplomacy and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism.

Before moving to the Middle East, he wrote for Money magazine in New York, newspapers in Massachusetts, and business publications after graduating from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and the Eugene Lang College of the New School for Social Research. He has taught undergraduate journalism at Purchase College and Pratt Institute in New York and has appeared frequently as a guest speaker on university campuses.

Born in Iran, he grew up in the Chicago area and New York City. He speaks Persian as well as some Spanish, German, Arabic, and a little French and Turkish.

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