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Tue, Feb 4, 2020

What Trump’s State of the Union means for US foreign policy

US President Donald J. Trump used his third State of the Union address to argue that his administration has “launched the great American comeback” through its economic policies and tough international stances. In a speech that focused heavily on domestic issues, his discussion of foreign policy mainly highlighted what he believed to be his major foreign policy successes, rather than announcements of new plans.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

China Energy & Environment

Mon, Jan 13, 2020

Spotlight: Alejandro Giammattei’s first 100 days

Guatemala will begin a new chapter with the presidential inauguration of Alejandro Giammattei Falla. At the center of the incoming pro-business administration: ushering in a new era of economic growth and job creation. With 59 percent of Guatemalans living in poverty, Central America’s largest and most populous country is also one the poorest and most unequal nations in Latin America.

Issue Brief by María Fernanda Pérez Argüello and Domingo Sadurní

Latin America Migration

Wed, Dec 11, 2019

With bipartisan support, USMCA “can stand the test of time”

“It is absolutely crucial for USMCA to be ratified with bipartisan support, and hopefully by including the Democrats in the process it will be an agreement that will serve the interest of all three countries for years to come," said Jason Marczak, director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

New Atlanticist by Jasper Gilardi

Mexico Trade

Maria Fernanda Perez Arguello is Associate Director at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, where she leads the Center’s work on Mexico, USMCA (i.e. NAFTA), and Central America, and contributes to projects on China- Latin America, regional trade integration as well as disinformation in Latin America. During her time at the Council, she has co-led the Center’s Central America Task Force, managed the Center’s trade portfolio, and programmed events in Asia for US policymakers.

Prior to joining the Atlantic Council, Maria Fernanda worked at the Inter-American Dialogue, Cato Institute, and Council of the Americas. She speaks native Spanish, English, and French, fluent Italian, and near-fluent Portuguese.

Originally from Costa Rica, Maria Fernanda earned a degree in European Studies from Sorbonne University in France, as well as a master’s degree in Latin American Studies and Political Economy from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, and a master’s in International Law and Human Rights from the United Nations University for Peace.