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Fri, Apr 3, 2020

Can coronavirus achieve elusive unity in Bosnia and Herzegovina?

Their initial response to the COVID-19 outbreak shows that even the staunchest opponents of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s unity are capable of working within its institutions and putting the public interest before their ethno-political ambitions. Now they only need to be willing to do so outside of the threat of a global pandemic.

New Atlanticist by Semir Dzebo and Shelby Magid

Coronavirus Politics & Diplomacy

Shelby Magid is an assistant director with the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center, where she assists in leading the center’s work on Ukraine and Georgia, including strategy and development, along with major domestic and international events. Prior to joining the Council, Shelby spent time at the German Marshall Fund of the United States focused on democracy in Central and Eastern Europe; she was also at the International Federation for Human Rights’ office in The Hague where she worked with the International Criminal Court and conducted research on human rights violations in Mexico and Syria. Shelby received her bachelor’s degree from Brandeis University in International and Global Studies. As part of her undergraduate studies, she took courses at Leiden University’s Law School and the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies. Shelby holds a master’s degree in International Relations, with a focus on security and international justice, from Central European University.