Kuwait

  • Joint Arab Military Force: A Force for Stability?

    The heads of Arab League countries agreed at a summit in Egypt last month to set up a joint military force.

    Tarek Radwan, an Associate Director for the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center and editor of the MENASource blog, interviewed Atlantic Council analysts who weighed in on these plans.

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  • NATO Seeks to Deepen Cooperation with Gulf Partners

    For 10 years, NATO's relations with the Gulf partners have grown deeper and stronger. And this is good, because the more we cooperate, the safer we will be.
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  • Strengthening NATO-Gulf Cooperation

    NATO is playing its part too. We all stand with our Ally Turkey, which is literally on the front line. And while the air campaign is not a NATO operation, NATO Allies provide the bulk of the military assets that are now being deployed to degrade ISIL.
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  • Gulf States Reactions to the New War in Iraq

    Since the Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) took over (and now rebranded) territory in Iraq, Gulf States have been somewhat less alarmed by this new Sunni uprising than they have about other more political factors in the conflict.
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  • Youth Activism in the Gulf States: Breaking Taboos

    The rise of social media has had a profound effect on youth throughout the world, but in the Gulf in particular this new outlet for information exchange has created a space for activism that was impossible until now. On March 21, 2014, the Atlantic Council launched a new issue brief, “Breaking Taboos: Youth Activism in the Gulf States,” by Visiting Senior Fellow Kristin Smith Diwan. Hariri Center Acting Director Danya Greenfield moderated  the discussion between Diwan and Marc Lynch, professor of political science at George Washington University. The discussion also featured video clips of interviews with two youth activists in Gulf, Yacoub al-Slaise of Bahrain’s al-Fateh Youth Coalition and Shaima Alasiri of Kuwait’s Civil Democratic Movement.
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  • Gulf Youth Test Their Limits

    The wave of uprisings that took place across the Arab world in 2011 never took hold in the Arabian penninsula, but the political awakening sparked youth movements in the Gulf to demand change from their respective governments through novel and creative means.
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  • The Gulf and Geoeconomics

    The sizable financing provided by the Gulf countries, in particular Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to Egypt since the popular uprising in 2011 led many observers to conclude that Gulf states have started using their vast resources to shape the region, direct political developments, and mold strategic relationships; in other words, the Gulf is now engaged in “geoeconomics”—the use of economic instruments to achieve geopolitical objectives.
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  • Breaking Taboos: Youth Activism in the Gulf States

    In a new Atlantic Council issue brief, Breaking Taboos: Youth Activism in the Gulf States, Visiting Senior Fellow Kristin Diwan contends that youth activists are bringing new forms of civic engagement and political contestation to the Arab states in the Gulf region.  Evaluating  youth movements in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Bahrain, Diwan contends that although youth activists have recently suffered setbacks under government restrictions, the political implications of a growing youth population will intensify, especially as an aging Gulf leadership faces its own generational transition.

    pdfRead the Issue Brief (PDF)

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  • New Government in Kuwait, but No New Politics

    On Monday Kuwait announced its sixth government since Sheikh Jaber Mubarak al-Hamad Al Sabah assumed the premiership in 2011. The latest cabinet reshuffle appeared aimed at improving relations with the current parliament (the National Assembly) which is seen as more favorable to the government. Yet almost immediately, members of parliament, once solidly in the pro-government camp, attacked the new formation.
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  • Eroding Civil Liberties in Kuwait

    The sentencing of popular Kuwaiti opposition leader Musallem al-Barrak on April 15 for insulting the amir, Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah is part of a pattern of deteriorating civil liberties in Kuwait. Although the roots of the current conflict can be traced back to a 2006 social movement whose aim was to change the election law to make electoral corruption more expensive and difficult, the two unscheduled 2012 parliamentary elections (one in February 2012 and the second in December 2012) provide a convenient starting point from which to trace the current political conflict.
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