Brazil

  • Elections Key to Brazil’s Recovery

    A good-humored people by nature, Brazilians know how to take misfortune in stride. On social media, memes and videos poke fun at the widespread corruption allegations that have mired the nation. Almost every politician and the most prominent businessmen have been tainted, leading to one of Brazil’s worst democratic crises since the fall of the authoritarian military dictatorship in 1985. Even as Brazil’s economy is on the mend, the fate of its president, Michel Temer, and that of the Brazilian government hang in the balance.

    Brazil’s attorney general may indict Temer for corruption and obstruction of justice in the coming days. The outcome of the Supreme Electoral Tribunal’s deliberation of the validity of the 2014 Rousseff-Temer election ticket could also provide the means to Temer’s end. Can Temer hold on to the presidency? And what lies ahead for Brazil if he fails?

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  • Murta Joins CGTN to Discuss the Impacts of Brazil’s Political Crisis on the Economy


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  • The End of Corruption Culture in Latin America?

    Accountability in the region creates space for safer investments

    Odebrecht was once synonymous with Latin America’s most ambitious public works projects. Today, those who hear the name think only of the web of malfeasance that has engulfed the region and continues to extend beyond the continent. But, as negative as these new revelations may seem, there is light at the end of the tunnel, and opportunities along the way. The pragmatic efforts of police and judicial actors show that some countries in the region are ready to face impunity head on. If Latin America can continue down the road to accountability, US investors could be the first to benefit.

    What started as a money laundering investigation in Brazil in 2014, the case of Odebrecht, Brazil’s largest construction company, has today developed into the deepest corruption scandal Latin America has seen, with top leaders implicated. Just this week, major newspapers reported the Brazilian Supreme Court has authorized investigations into more than one hundred Brazilian politicians. In December, Odebrecht pleaded guilty in a US court to paying nearly $800 million in bribes to win business in more than ten countries, dating back to the early 2000s. The company was subsequently slapped with a record fine of $3.5 billion by the Brazilian, US, and Swiss judiciaries in December. It seems the times are changing.

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  • Brazil Braces for Another Tumultuous Year

    Throughout 2016, Brazilians and foreigners alike kept stating—and hoping—that 2017 would bring more stability, allowing Brazil to reform and grow its economy. But those of us who thought we were heading into calmer waters will have to think again.

    The new year is gearing up to be another tumultuous one for Brazil, in spite of the country’s recent political recalibration.

    The past several weeks have shown that political stability is still out of reach. Just look at the attempted removal of the Senate president, Renan Calheiros, by a Supreme Court justice in early December. Calheiros, an ally of Brazilian President Michel Temer, managed to stay in power, but mounting accusations against him for suspected involvement in the Car Wash corruption scandal have raised questions about his political survival.

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  • Brazil Chat Series – Economic Outlook: Can the New Government Revamp Growth?

    In New York this week, Brazilian President Michel Temer embraced the opportunity to convince investors that Brazil has entered a new era. Brazil’s economy, long in steep decline and with twelve million people unemployed, has started to show signs of rebounding. Inflation is decelerating and analysts have revised GDP growth projections upwards from 0 to up to 2 percent for next year.

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  • Murta Quoted by Forbes on the Future of Brazil's Democracy


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  • Murta Quoted by Forbes on Brazilian Social Reforms


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  • Brazil After Dilma: A Reason for Optimism

    A year ago, Dilma Rousseff, the former president of Brazil, and Eduardo Cunha, the former speaker of the House of Representatives, were involved in a public duel that threatened the pillars of the republic. Today, both have lost their jobs. That doesn’t mean that a turbulent chapter in Brazil’s history has ended. Now begins an arduous battle in which the country’s controversial new leaders must pass the reforms needed to get Brazil’s economy growing again. Although the challenges are considerable, Brazilians have reasons to be optimistic.

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  • What Does Dilma Rousseff’s Impeachment Mean for Brazil?

    Brazil’s Senate on August 31 impeached President Dilma Rousseff, the country’s first female president, on the grounds that she had manipulated the budget to conceal growing economic problems.

    Jason Marczak, director of the Latin America Economic Growth Initiative at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, discussed the implications of the impeachment for Brazil’s democracy, economy, and politics in an interview with the New Atlanticist’s Ashish Kumar Sen. Here are excerpts from our interview.

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  • Marczak Quoted by Fox News Latino on the Brazil Senate's Decision to Impeach Rousseff


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