Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the first in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on the current state of discussions.

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In the coastal state of Odisha, India, female farmers have turned a crisis into an opportunity.

Cyclones, sea-level rise, and increasing water salinity have devastated their communities and turned swaths of fertile ground into wasteland. For years, these women lost income, their health and nutrition suffered, and they found themselves ever more marginalized.  

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While the United States and China grapple over trade, intellectual property rights, technology transfer, and geopolitical tensions in East Asia, open competition has not yet extended to the Middle East, a region where Washington remains a major player and Beijing has rapidly expanded its influence.

“The story has not been written yet on the Middle East,” William Wechsler, director of the Atlantic Council’s Middle East programs, said on June 6. “There are a number of places where the United States’ and China’s interests align. And there are a number of places where the United States’ and China’s interests do not.”

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The world took time to pause this week to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings in World War II and the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown. While attention was focused on these anniversaries, did you keep up with the other big news stories this week? Take seven questions to put your knowledge to the test.

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Open up a newspaper today and it seems like trends are pointing to one global crisis after another. A recent United Nations report suggested that one million plant and animal species are at risk of extinction by the end of the century. Every day, 45,000 people are forced to flee their homes due to conflict or natural disaster. The West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which contains enough ice to elevate sea levels up to 10 feet, is at risk of collapse.


And then you read a story about a pregnant whale that washed up dead in Italy with 30 pounds of plastic in its stomach, and another one about the two back-to-back cyclones that devastated the people of Mozambique, and at this point, your heart is broken. The human toll and financial costs of these global challenges brings previously unimaginable realities to life.

With all this on my mind, I am excited to have joined the Atlantic Council to lead a new multi-disciplinary team and enterprise, the Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center, which will help address these massive challenges.

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On May 23, leaders in New Delhi launched the first LGBT Chamber of Commerce—just days after the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia and less than a year after the Supreme Court of India decriminalized same-sex relationships. The first LGBT Chamber in South Asia, only the second in all of Asia, was created by a newly formed organization, RWS – India’s Diverse Chamber. Since decriminalization, and years after the Supreme Court upheld the protections of transgender and third-gender people, civil society and the private sector have increasingly addressed LGBT issues, making this an ideal time for an LGBT Chamber of Commerce.

With its launch in India, this is now the fifteenth chamber to join a network of LGBT Chambers of Commerce around the world. Started by the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC) in the United States, the NGLCC Global Network is comprised of autonomous partners throughout the Western Hemisphere, Europe, South Africa, and Australia. Each chamber comes together to collaborate, share best practices, and advocate policies—all with the underlying mission to promote LGBT economic empowerment.

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A white flag of surrender was raised aloft over the Knesset just after the stroke of midnight on May 29. Six nail-biting weeks after he was first tasked by Israeli President Reuven Rivlin to construct Israel's next government, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was forced to concede defeat and admit that he had failed to cobble together a new ruling coalition.

Faced with a series of options, the incumbent prime minister pulled the scorched earth lever. According to Israeli law, an expired mandate returns to the country's president, who may then tap a different parliamentarian to try and craft a government. In order to block Rivlin from exercising that prerogative, Netanyahu assembled a preemptive majority to vote for new elections instead. He hopes surely to improve his own prospects when the repeat ballot takes place on September 17.

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“Earn this.” So says Capt. John Miller to the eponymous soldier in the epic film Saving Private Ryan, which depicts the monumental undertaking of the D-Day invasion of Normandy. On the 75th anniversary of that tide-turning battle in the European theater of World War Two, it is worth reflecting on the legacy of the battle and the sacrifices of the men who fought it.

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The dark web, a part of the Internet that promises relative anonymity by requiring specific software for access, is shrinking after years of defunct sites, exit scams, and indictments. A new generation of criminals, dissidents, and privacy enthusiasts, however, will likely revive it using stronger anonymizing protocols while also conducting more criminal activity on the clear web.

The dark web aims to hide its users’ web browsing, e-mail, and even instant messaging from law enforcement and oppressive regimes by using “The Onion Router,” or Tor software. A free web browser partially developed by the US government, Tor provides its users with free access to a worldwide network of thousands of relays maintained by volunteers. By encrypting user traffic and by bouncing it around the relay network at random, Tor obfuscates a user’s activity. This shielding enables users in countries with controlled media to anonymously access restricted information, such as the New York Times’ dark web site. This same anonymizing ability, however, also allows criminals to buy and sell narcotics, firearms, malware, stolen identities, and illegal pornography with a decent chance of not getting caught.

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You may have noticed a sudden influx of rainbow-themed merchandise in stores and online. June marks LGBTI Pride Month, dedicated to the celebration of queer individuals across the United States. We celebrate queer pride every year in June to commemorate the protests against a police raid on Stonewall Inn, a gay bar, in New York City on June 28, 1969.

But Stonewall, while a pivotal and defining moment in queer history, never came to a satisfying conclusion. Even today, queer activists and individuals across the world are fighting for their lives, trying to escape state-sanctioned violence and community persecution.

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