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Mon, Mar 30, 2020

What COVID-19 means for the United States’ economic and financial statecraft

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, monetary authorities at the US Federal Reserve have undertaken unprecedented actions to support liquidity in global markets. These steps have included support for domestic debt markets, including a recent expansion in the corporate bond market, as well as swap lines targeting the global dollar shortage. Beyond these moves, the broader policy response during and after the COVID-19 outbreak may drive longer-term changes in the global trading system.

New Atlanticist by Michael Greenwald

Coronavirus International Markets

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

The economic battleground between China and the United Kingdom

The importance of the Shanghai-London Stock Connect suspension will depend on whether additional policy moves targeting large British firms will follow. In terms of tangible effects, this event causes little economic disruption, but is probably the most symbolically important use of Chinese financial sanctions thus far.

New Atlanticist by Michael Greenwald

China Financial Regulation

Thu, Jan 16, 2020

The effect of US sanctions on the Iran-Iraq alliance

The potential sanctions against Iraq under consideration now could damage the United States’ goals in that country and would only embolden Iran’s position—the exact scenario that US policy has tried to avoid. Economic countermeasures, such as restrictions to Iraq’s Federal Reserve accounts—could not only cede economic clout within Iraq to Tehran but could also have significant impact on the US dollar's global position.

New Atlanticist by Michael Greenwald

Economic Sanctions

Michael B. Greenwald is the Senior Advisor to the President and CEO of the Atlantic Council, Fred Kempe. 

Greenwald previously worked in senior roles within the United States Treasury in positions working with Africa, Europe, and serving as a financial diplomat in the Middle East spanning the tenures of U.S. Treasury Secretaries Geithner, Lew and Mnuchin. Most recently, he served as the first United States Treasury Attaché appointed to Qatar and Kuwait and opened the Treasury Department’s office in Doha, Qatar in August 2015. Prior to that role, Greenwald served as the United States Treasury Policy Advisor for Europe. In this role, he was appointed as the head of the United States Delegation to the Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti-Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism before the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, France. Greenwald was part of the U.S. Treasury team that crafted U.S. sanctions against Russia, the largest U.S. sanctions program to date, and negotiated similar sanctions by Europe.

He has also served in a variety of roles in the U.S. Intelligence Community and in the Office of General Council at the U.S Treasury working closely with the National Security Council at the White House working on issues related to countering ISIS, Al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, Hamas, Iran, Ukraine/Russia, Syria, and North Korea.

Since leaving the United States Government in July 2017, Greenwald serves as the Senior Vice President of Tiedemann Advisors. He is a senior member of the firm’s business development strategy team.  He works closely with clients to understand and help implement their goals and objectives.  Greenwald serves as the Special Advisor on International Affairs to the President and CEO of Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Dr. Laurie Glimcher.

Greenwald is a Belfer Center Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affair. His expertise is in illicit finance, sanctions, and the Gulf/Middle East. Greenwald is an Adjunct Professor at The Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University where he teaches Global Policy: Countering Terrorist Financing. He also teaches The New Normal of Economic Statecraft in the Middle East.

A frequent speaker on international security, the Middle East and illicit finance issues, Greenwald’s past speaking engagements include lectures at the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Institute, the Atlantic Council, Harvard University, Yale Law School, Stanford, Columbia University, and Northwestern Business School in Doha.

Greenwald earned a Juris Doctor degree from Boston University School of Law, a Master of Arts from Boston University’s Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, and a Bachelor of Arts in History from George Washington University. He is a graduate of St. Marks School in Southborough, Massachusetts.