Roberta Braga

  • Open for Business: A New Chapter for US-Brazil Relations?

    Previewing President Bolsonaro’s first official visit to the United States, the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted the public event “Open for Business: A New Chapter for US-Brazil Relations?” on February 28. Roberta Braga, associate director at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, moderated the discussion between Murillo de Aragão, founder and CEO of Arko Advice, Renata Vargas Amaral, founder and president of Women Inside Trade Association and director of international trade at Barral M. Jorge and Associates, and Ambassador Anthony S. Harrington, former US ambassador to Brazil and chair of Albright Stonebridge Group’s Managing Board.


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  • Brazil’s Bolsonaro in 2019: What to Expect from LatAm’s Newest Leader

    Jair Bolsonaro was inaugurated as president of Brazil on January 1. Since taking the helm of Latin America’s largest democracy, the Bolsonaro administration has announced controversial decrees and discussed necessary reforms. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Brazilian Center for International Relations (CEBRI), hosted a public event on the heels of the Davos Economic Forum and just three weeks following the inauguration to discuss the next one hundred days of the new administration and the potential impacts of its policy proposals. Panelists included Fabio Kanczuk, executive director for Brazil at the World Bank, newly appointed by the Brazilian administration; Dr. José Pio Borges, chair of the board of trustees for CEBRI; and Pablo Bentes, managing director for international trade and investment at Steptoe and Johnson, LLC.


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  • Braga Quoted in LA Times on US-Brazil Relations


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  • Braga Quoted in LA Times on Brazil's Bolsonaro


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  • Braga Quoted in NYT on Bolsonaro's Cabinet


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  • Braga in the Hill: Brazil Election Shows it's Time for Digital Resilience


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  • Jair Bolsonaro Wins in Brazil: What Should the US and the World Expect from the President-Elect?

    A day after the second round of elections in Brazil, the Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted a Members and Press Call to discuss what Bolsonaro's presidency might mean for Brazil and for the future of US-Brazil bilateral relations. Below is the complete transcript and audio of the call.

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  • Brazil Swings Right With Election of Jair Bolsonaro as President

    Former army captain’s victory marks first time since 2002 that the left-wing Workers’ Party (PT) has not won a presidential election

    For the first time since the early 2000s, Brazilians have elected a president that does not belong to the Workers’ Party (PT).

    On October 28, Brazilians elected as their president Jair Bolsonaro, a populist former army captain who has served as a member of the Chamber of Deputies representing the state of Rio de Janeiro since 1991. Bolsonaro, who belongs to the Social Liberal Party (PSL), defeated his PT rival, Fernando Haddad, in a runoff election after a highly contested election. Bolsonaro won 55.1 percent of the votes against 44.9 percent for Haddad.

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  • Braga Quoted in NYT on Disinformation in Brazil Presidential Elections


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  • Led by Leftists Since 2003, Brazil Could Soon Get a Far-Right President

    Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right populist who has been compared to Donald J. Trump, won the first round of the presidential election in Brazil on October 7, but fell just short of the majority required to avoid a second-round runoff. The former army captain will face left-wing Workers’ Party (PT) candidate, Fernando Haddad, in a runoff on October 28.

    Bolsonaro belongs to the Social Liberal Party (PSL). He has a history of making incendiary remarks about women, minorities, and gays; he has also promised to get tough on crime and corruption. He won just under 47 percent of the vote, his closest competitor, Haddad, got 28 percent.

    “Bolsonaro’s near victory in the first round shows Brazilians are fed up with insecurity and corruption, and desperately want their economic fortunes reversed,” said Jason Marczak, director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

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