Thirty years after independence, Ukraine continues to reform and modernize its key government institutions. Reform may finally reach the Security Service of Ukraine (SBU), a sprawling agency whose operations now extend beyond its nominal counterintelligence mandate. A draft law introduced by lawmakers earlier this year aims to tackle the inefficiencies and loopholes for corruption that currently pervade the SBU. But significant work remains—the addition of important reform provisions and the omission of new challenges to transparency could further strengthen the bill.

What issues still stand in the way of comprehensive SBU reform? How can Ukraine create a more efficient and more accountable security service that better protects the interests of its citizens?

Mariana Bezuhla, deputy chair of the Verkhovna Rada’s Committee on National Security, Defense, and Intelligence, Oleksandr Danylyuk, chair of the Center for Defense Reform and former secretary of the National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine, Sergii Ionushas, deputy chair of the Verkhovna Rada’s Committee on Law Enforcement, Roman Kostenko, secretary of the Verkhovna Rada’s Committee on National Security, Defense, and Intelligence, and Oleksandra Matviichuk, head of the board at the Center for Civil Liberties, join to discuss SBU reform in Ukraine. Melinda Haring, deputy director of the Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center, moderates.

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The Eurasia Center’s mission is to enhance transatlantic cooperation in promoting stability, democratic values and prosperity in Eurasia, from Eastern Europe and Turkey in the West to the Caucasus, Russia and Central Asia in the East.

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