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Wed, Jan 29, 2020

The United States must end its contradictory Pakistan policy

Washington has a long history of tacitly supporting the Pakistan Army’s unrivaled political power while publicly espousing the ideals of democracy and political pluralism. Such doublespeak only enables corrupt and unaccountable segments of the political and security establishments in Pakistan. It also impedes the United States from achieving its regional goals of democracy promotion and counterterrorism.

New Atlanticist by Harris Samad

Democratic Transitions Pakistan

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

The Pakistani courts strike back

The historic sentencing in December of former dictator and president Pervez Musharraf was a blow to the military’s image and directly questions its unequivocal authority over shaping Pakistan’s political life—even if it is only symbolic. In a rare streak of defiance, the country’s courts are pushing back against a traditionally powerful and popular establishment hoping to inch the country from a seemingly illiberal to a more liberal democracy.

New Atlanticist by Fatima Salman

Democratic Transitions Pakistan

Mon, Jan 13, 2020

Younus in his podcast “Pakistonomy,” Episode 1: Khurram Husain

In the News by Atlantic Council

Economy & Business Inclusive Growth

Mon, Jan 6, 2020

Shaping the global future together: the Council’s “Top fifteen hits” of 2019

We look back at the Atlantic Council’s top work of 2019 galvanizing US leadership alongside partners and allies to tackle the most pressing challenges confronting our nation and our world.

New Atlanticist by Frederick Kempe

Africa Americas

Fri, Dec 20, 2019

Could the United States and India find a path to collaborate on China trade?

So why shouldn’t the Trump administration consider expanding its bilateral trade cooperation with India to initiate joint efforts on China, which could parallel existing efforts with the EU and Japan and possibly merge with them over time? Might this approach even lead to a new plurilateral negotiation in the World Trade Organization (WTO) that positions it as the most likely venue for tackling Chinese practices over the longer term?

New Atlanticist by Mark Linscott

China India

Wed, Dec 11, 2019

US-India relationship is “moving from the era of ambitions to the era of achievements”

Sixty years after US President Dwight D. Eisenhower traveled to India to mark the beginning of the US-Indian relationship, the close ties between Delhi and Washington today “would scarcely be recognizable to Eisenhower’s contemporaries,” Ambassador Alice Wells, US acting assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asia, said on December 11.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

India Politics & Diplomacy

Tue, Dec 10, 2019

Don’t let tech policy disrupt the US-India trade deal

Yet as negotiators prepare for the final stage of the talks, India’s efforts to advance three new tech policies could emerge as a potential spoiler. Preventing a downward spiral in bilateral trade relations will require India to tread cautiously in its approach to tech policy and delay new measures that would disrupt a trade deal.

New Atlanticist by Anand Raghuraman

India Trade

Fri, Dec 6, 2019

Afghanistan at a crossroads

After decades of conflict, today there is at least a prospect that a path to peace in Afghanistan might be opened. At the same time, it seems that once again the country is at a crossroads, with its future to be determined by decisions that will be taken in the coming weeks by Afghans, their partners, and their adversaries. Those decisions can set the stage for further success in the hard struggle of the Afghan people and their elected leaders for the better future they are striving for.

New Atlanticist by James B. Cunningham

Afghanistan Conflict

Thu, Nov 7, 2019

The United States cannot repeat its Syria withdrawal mistake in Afghanistan

President Trump’s sudden withdrawal has opened opportunities for rival powers to exert greater influence in the Middle East and in Afghanistan. Russia and China are swooping in with strategic poise, while Trump’s approach amounts to letting others “fight a little bit.” This is not US leadership, nor will it make the United States safer in an increasingly complex world.

New Atlanticist by Fatima Salman

Afghanistan Conflict

Mon, Oct 21, 2019

Kashmir is driving Pakistan’s mediation efforts between Tehran and Riyadh

From Imran Khan’s perspective, the issue of Kashmir has not attracted enough international attention. Mediating de-escalation in the Persian Gulf could strengthen his ability to bring more attention to that crisis too.

IranSource by Fatemeh Aman

India Iran