Latin America

  • Marczak Quoted in Reuters on Trump Administration Officials Planned Meeting with Mexico's President-Elect


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  • AMLO's Election: What Does it Mean for Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond?

    On July 12, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted an event titled, “AMLO’s Election: What Does it Mean for Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond?” The event explored the aftermath of President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s (AMLO) historic election on July 1, 2018 and its impact on the future Mexican domestic policy and hemispheric relations. Mexico has seen positive advancements in recent years, including a flourishing startup-culture, increased access to technology and innovation, and high degrees of civic engagement and grassroots activism. Despite this progress, deep-rooted, systematic problems remained at the forefront of voters’ minds: crime and insecurity, corruption, and a stagnant economy.

    The panel featured experts with diverse backgrounds in Mexican political affairs, including: Dr. Paula Stern, Chairwoman and founder of the Stern Group, Inc. and former-Chairwoman of the US International Trade Commission; José Díaz Briseño, Washington, D.C. correspondent for Reforma; Dr. Antonio Ortiz-Mena, Senior Vice President at Albright Stonebridge Group and former-Head of Economic Affairs at the Embassy of Mexico in the United States; and Jason Marczak, Director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center. The panelist discussion and Q&A was moderated by Katherine Pereira, Associate Director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

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  • Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s First 100 Days

    Mexico is poised for a new era of prosperity if deep structural issues are adequately addressed.


    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are four of the top issues President-elect López Obrador might prioritize in his first 100 days in office?

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  • Marczak in The Hill: Mexicans voted for change — now what?


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  • AMLO's Turn: Challenges for the Next Mexican President

    After overturning the Mexican political establishment and capturing an astounding fifty-three percent of the vote, President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador must face his next challenge: governing.

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  • Wayne Joins BBC to Discuss Mexico's New President


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  • President-Elect AMLO: A Seismic Shift in Mexico

    For Andrés Manuel López Obrador it was third time lucky.

    The new president-elect, popularly known as AMLO, won Mexico’s July 1 presidential election by a landslide picking up more than 50 percent of the vote.

    A self-described nationalist leader who hails from the southern state of Tabasco and is a former mayor of Mexico City, AMLO twice ran unsuccessfully for the presidency in 2006 and 2012.

    “AMLO’s election is a seismic shift in Mexico that cannot be understated,” said Jason Marczak, director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

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  • Mexico’s Energy Reforms: The Prospects Under an AMLO Administration

    The election of Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) augurs great uncertainty over the direction of Mexico’s seminal 2013 energy reforms. As a candidate, AMLO spoke in favor of pausing new offerings for oil and gas investment acreage, building more refining capacity within Mexico, and developing the nation’s gas supplies. Changes in Mexico’s energy framework will likely be incremental, but there is much that industry, think tanks, and even the US government can do to address the concerns raised by the president-elect during the campaign.

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  • Pereira Quoted in AFP on Mexico's President-Elect and the Future of US-Mexico Relations


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  • Gender Equality Should be a Priority for Mexico's Next President

    On July 1, voters in Mexico will head to the polls to fill more than 3,000 elected positions. The presidency, senate, and the chamber of deputies, as well as state and municipal positions are up for grabs. Although women eighteen and older comprise 52 percent of the electorate (44,483,446 votes), presidential candidates’ proposals on gender equality were given little attention during the campaign trail.

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