The fall war between Armenia and Azerbaijan ended with a ceasefire brokered by the Kremlin on November 10. The ceasefire in place allowed Azerbaijan to hold on to the territory that it had regained on the battlefield; but it also allowed Russian troops into Nagorno-Karabakh as peacekeepers. While largely observed, the ceasefire has been marred by sporadic fighting. On January 11 Russian President Putin met with Azerbaijan’s President Aliyev and Armenia’s Prime Minister Pashinyan to help maintain the ceasefire. Yet Armenia and Azerbaijan continue to disagree regarding the eventual disposition of Nagorno-Karabakh. 

On Monday, January 25, Hikmet Hajiyev, foreign policy adviser to President Aliyev, joins Eurasia Center Director John Herbst for a one-on-one conversation regarding what is happening on the ground, Baku’s position on the conflict, and the prospects for finding a negotiated solution to the conflict. 

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The Eurasia Center’s mission is to enhance transatlantic cooperation in promoting stability, democratic values and prosperity in Eurasia, from Eastern Europe and Turkey in the West to the Caucasus, Russia and Central Asia in the East.