Mexico

  • USMCA is Not a Done Deal. It Must Still Clear Three Legislative Hurdles

    On November 30, the leaders of the United States, Canada, and Mexico signed the US-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA), modernizing the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and “rebalancing” trade relations between the three countries, according to the US administration.  Before the new pact officially takes effect, however, the legislatures of all three countries need to approve the agreement.

    The USMCA would preserve the massive trading and shared-production networks that support millions of jobs in the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Those networks support North America’s ability to compete effectively with China, Europe, and other economic powers. Approving USMCA this year would thus appear to be in the economic interest all three countries, providing certainty for the $1.3 trillion in three-way trade and for the many businesses, workers, and farmers that depend on the commerce and co-production that interlinks North America. Since USMCA will last at least sixteen years, its approval should provide certainty to encourage private sector investment in strengthening North America’s continental marketplace.


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  • Marczak in USA Today: US Should Welcome Mexico's Bold New Steps to Help Migrants and Central America


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  • Five Takeaways from Latin America’s Presidential Elections in 2018

    In 2018, the three largest countries in Latin America—Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil—elected new heads of state. Colombia voted in its youngest president, Iván Duque; Mexico elected left-wing populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO); and Brazil chose former army captain and right-wing candidate Jair Bolsonaro. As the three leaders kick off their respective mandates, and as other elections shape up in the region, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center highlights five overarching trends that warrant a closer look and that are likely to affect the region over the next five years.

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  • Wayne Testifies Before Senate Committee on the Judiciary on Border Security and Us-Mexico Economic Ties


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  • With AMLO, an Opportunity to Reset the US-Mexico Relationship

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador to be sworn in as Mexico’s president on December 1

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador has his work cut out.

    The populist leader, who is more popularly known as AMLO, will be sworn in as the president of Mexico on December 1. This may be good news for the US-Mexico relationship.

    “After an erratic relationship between [US President Donald J.] Trump and [outgoing Mexican President Enrique] Peña Nieto, López Obrador’s inauguration opens the door for a reset in US-Mexico relations,” said Jason Marczak, director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

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  • Trump, Trudeau, and Peña Nieto Sign New Trade Agreement: Here’s What You Need to Know About the USMCA

    In 1994, when the North American Free Trade Agreement went into force, it intrinsically linked the economies of the United States, Mexico, and Canada; becoming the lynchpin of the North American economy and amplifying its competitiveness in the international market.

    Nearly twenty-five years later, a new, modernized trilateral trade deal between these three countries was signed by US President Donald J. Trump, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Argentina on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on November 30.

    Trump called it a “truly groundbreaking achievement.” The USMCA must still be approved by the US Congress where Democrats will take control of the House of Representatives in January.

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  • Wayne in The Hill: The time to build lasting bonds between US and Mexico is now


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  • USMCA at Signing: Implications for Consumers and the Road Ahead for Congress

    Almost twenty-five years ago, the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Mexico, and Canada went into force and became a critical part of the North American economy. On Friday, November 30, 2018 these three countries will sign a new, modernized trade deal known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA. As did its predecessor, this agreement will impact millions of jobs, trade-dependent communities, and investment in key sectors.
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  • Wayne in The Hill: US spotlight fixed squarely on AMLO as he takes reins in Mexico


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  • USMCA: The New North American Trade Deal

    Just minutes before the September 30 deadline, the United States and Canada – following the US-Mexico deal – reached a new trade accord that modernizes the nearly 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement. The newly rebranded United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement is now set to be signed before December 1, 2018. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a rapid reaction conference call on Tuesday, October 2 to discuss key points of the deal and the implications for the future of North American relations. Below is the audio recording and summary.

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