Mexico

  • Five Takeaways from Latin America’s Presidential Elections in 2018

    In 2018, the three largest countries in Latin America—Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil—elected new heads of state. Colombia voted in its youngest president, Iván Duque; Mexico elected left-wing populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO); and Brazil chose former army captain and right-wing candidate Jair Bolsonaro. As the three leaders kick off their respective mandates, and as other elections shape up in the region, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center highlights five overarching trends that warrant a closer look and that are likely to affect the region over the next five years.

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  • With AMLO, an Opportunity to Reset the US-Mexico Relationship

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador to be sworn in as Mexico’s president on December 1

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador has his work cut out.

    The populist leader, who is more popularly known as AMLO, will be sworn in as the president of Mexico on December 1. This may be good news for the US-Mexico relationship.

    “After an erratic relationship between [US President Donald J.] Trump and [outgoing Mexican President Enrique] Peña Nieto, López Obrador’s inauguration opens the door for a reset in US-Mexico relations,” said Jason Marczak, director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

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  • Trump, Trudeau, and Peña Nieto Sign New Trade Agreement: Here’s What You Need to Know About the USMCA

    In 1994, when the North American Free Trade Agreement went into force, it intrinsically linked the economies of the United States, Mexico, and Canada; becoming the lynchpin of the North American economy and amplifying its competitiveness in the international market.

    Nearly twenty-five years later, a new, modernized trilateral trade deal between these three countries was signed by US President Donald J. Trump, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Argentina on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on November 30.

    Trump called it a “truly groundbreaking achievement.” The USMCA must still be approved by the US Congress where Democrats will take control of the House of Representatives in January.

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  • Wayne in The Hill: The time to build lasting bonds between US and Mexico is now


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  • USMCA at Signing: Implications for Consumers and the Road Ahead for Congress

    Almost twenty-five years ago, the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Mexico, and Canada went into force and became a critical part of the North American economy. On Friday, November 30, 2018 these three countries will sign a new, modernized trade deal known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA. As did its predecessor, this agreement will impact millions of jobs, trade-dependent communities, and investment in key sectors.
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  • Wayne in The Hill: US spotlight fixed squarely on AMLO as he takes reins in Mexico


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  • USMCA: The New North American Trade Deal

    Just minutes before the September 30 deadline, the United States and Canada – following the US-Mexico deal – reached a new trade accord that modernizes the nearly 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement. The newly rebranded United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement is now set to be signed before December 1, 2018. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a rapid reaction conference call on Tuesday, October 2 to discuss key points of the deal and the implications for the future of North American relations. Below is the audio recording and summary.

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  • A Modernized NAFTA

    The new trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico “modernizes” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and lifts a cloud of uncertainty that has lingered over the past several months, according to Earl Anthony Wayne, a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program.

    In negotiations that went down to the wire, Canada agreed on September 30 to join the United States and Mexico in a revised version of NAFTA. The new agreement will be referred to as the United State-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

    “Overall, each of the three countries showed flexibility, can claim wins from the new agreement, and gave up preferred positions to reach agreement,” said Wayne, who served as the US ambassador to Mexico from 2011 to 2015.

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  • Meet the New NAFTA: The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

    Canada agreed, moments before the clock ran out on a September 30 deadline, to sign on to a trade agreement between the United States and Mexico that would replace the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The new agreement will be known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA.

    US President Donald J. Trump announced the deal at the White House on October 1 describing it as a “brand new deal to terminate and replace NAFTA.” With this breakthrough, Trump has fulfilled his campaign promise to rewrite NAFTA, which he has called “the worst trade deal in history.” The new agreement was negotiated “on the principle of fairness and reciprocity,” said Trump.

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  • Conference Call: US-Mexico Trade Deal: Implications and Next Steps

    On Monday, August 27, 2018, President Trump announced that the United States and Mexico reached a deal on several contentious issues in NAFTA, calling it the United States-Mexico Trade Agreement. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a conference call the following day to discuss the implications on NAFTA’s three parties, their respective bilateral relations, and the overall future of North American relations.

    The call featured the following speakers: Jason Marczak, director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center; Valeria Moy, nonresident fellow of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center Atlantic Council and director of México, ¿Cómo vamos?; Miguel Noyola, partner and member of the Global International Commercial and Trade Practice Group at Baker McKenzie; and Bart Oosterveld, the C. Boyden Gray fellow on Global Finance and Growth and director of Global Business & Economics Program Atlantic Council.

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