Recent Events

Days after the first round of voting in the Brazilian election, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center and Digital Forensic Research Lab (DFRLab) hosted the conference call “Brazil's Vote: The Role of Disinformation in the 2018 Elections” to discuss the impact of disinformation and misinformation on Sunday’s results.

The Atlantic Council’s #ElectionWatch Latin America initiative has identified, exposed, and explained disinformation and the spread of misinformation in this year’s elections in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil. In Brazil, findings reveal that disinformation and misinformation circulated across Latin America's biggest democracy as voters headed to the polls in an extremely polarized environment.
On Tuesday, October 9, only two days after the first round of voting in Brazil, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America, the Brazil-US Business Council, and the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted the conference call “Brazilian Elections: Results and Expectations” to discuss the impact of the outcomes ahead of second-round voting on October 28. 

Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, kicked off the call with opening remarks, and Renata Vasconcellos, senior director of the Brazil-US Business Council, moderated the discussion between Ricardo Sennes, nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, and Monica de Bolle, director of the Latin American Studies and Emerging Markets Department at Johns Hopkins University (SAIS).
Just minutes before the September 30 deadline, the United States and Canada – following the US-Mexico deal – reached a new trade accord that modernizes the nearly 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement. The newly rebranded United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement is now set to be signed before December 1, 2018. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a rapid reaction conference call on Tuesday, October 2 to discuss key points of the deal and the implications for the future of North American relations. Below is the audio recording and summary.
On Monday, August 27, 2018, President Trump announced that the United States and Mexico reached a deal on several contentious issues in NAFTA, calling it the United States-Mexico Trade Agreement. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a conference call the following day to discuss the implications on NAFTA’s three parties, their respective bilateral relations, and the overall future of North American relations.

The call featured the following speakers: Jason Marczak, director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center; Valeria Moy, nonresident fellow of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center Atlantic Council and director of México, ¿Cómo vamos?; Miguel Noyola, partner and member of the Global International Commercial and Trade Practice Group at Baker McKenzie; and Bart Oosterveld, the C. Boyden Gray fellow on Global Finance and Growth and director of Global Business & Economics Program Atlantic Council.
On August 16, the first official day of the Brazilian presidential campaign, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Brazilian Center for International Relations (CEBRI), hosted the conference call, “Brazil’s Election Takes Shape.” The discussion focused on three primary issue facing the incoming administration: economic reform and trade; political reform; and safety and citizen security.
On July 12, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted an event titled, “AMLO’s Election: What Does it Mean for Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond?” The event explored the aftermath of President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s (AMLO) historic election on July 1, 2018 and its impact on the future Mexican domestic policy and hemispheric relations. Mexico has seen positive advancements in recent years, including a flourishing startup-culture, increased access to technology and innovation, and high degrees of civic engagement and grassroots activism. Despite this progress, deep-rooted, systematic problems remained at the forefront of voters’ minds: crime and insecurity, corruption, and a stagnant economy.

The panel featured experts with diverse backgrounds in Mexican political affairs, including: Dr. Paula Stern, Chairwoman and founder of the Stern Group, Inc. and former-Chairwoman of the US International Trade Commission; José Díaz Briseño, Washington, D.C. correspondent for Reforma; Dr. Antonio Ortiz-Mena, Senior Vice President at Albright Stonebridge Group and former-Head of Economic Affairs at the Embassy of Mexico in the United States; and Jason Marczak, Director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center. The panelist discussion and Q&A was moderated by Katherine Pereira, Associate Director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

On Tuesday, June 19, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted an event titled, “Colombia’s Vote: The Road Ahead for Iván Duque.” The event brought about a rapid reaction discussion to Iván Duque’s victory over Gustavo Petro in the Colombian election held on June 17th. The speakers touched on a range of topics, including the growing polarization in Colombia, the future of the peace accords, the neighboring crisis in Venezuela, and prospects for the Colombian economy.  

As presidential elections in Mexico approach, candidate Andrés Manuel López Obrador reached a new high of 48.12% voter support, according to a poll published on June 3rd by El Pais/Oraculus. Without runoff elections in Mexico, it is unlikely that José Antonio Meade’s coalition Todos por Mexico or Ricardo Anaya’s Por Mexico al Frente could effectively challenge AMLO’s lead. Continuing our series with advisers to Mexico’s top presidential candidates, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in collaboration with the Wilson Center’s Mexico Institute, hosted Carlos Manuel Urzúa Macías, adviser to AMLO.
On Thursday, May 31, 2018 President Trump’s administration imposed new steel and aluminum tariffs on Canada, Mexico, and European Union; three of the US’ closest allies. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a conference call the following day to discuss the regional and international implications of the tariffs. Below is the full audio recording and summary.

On Thursday, May 17, the Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center held a timely conference call to discuss Venezuela's May 20 electoral event with Juan Andrés Mejía, Representative of the State of Miranda in Venezuela's National Assembly, and Phil Gunson, Andes Project Senior Analyst at the International Crisis Group. Below is the full transcript. 



    

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