All Content

Fri, Feb 14, 2020

Flawed peace plan for Ukraine doesn’t pass muster

A distinguished international group of American, European, and Russian former government officials and think tank experts has taken advantage of the Munich Security Conference to issue a statement recommending twelve steps to bring greater security to Ukraine and the Euro-Atlantic region. For years, the Kremlin has tried to change the conversation on Ukraine, and they may have found their opening in Munich. In response, twenty-nine former US diplomats, government officials, and experts point out their errors.

UkraineAlert by Eurasia Center

Conflict Politics & Diplomacy

Mon, Feb 10, 2020

US-Ukraine relations: Ways forward

The Atlantic Council and the Victor Pinchuk Foundation hosted a private, Chatham House Rule roundtable discussion with a delegation of high-level form US ambassadors and government officials in Kyiv.

Press Release by Atlantic Council

Politics & Diplomacy Ukraine

Thu, Feb 6, 2020

US-Ukraine relations: Ways forward

A delegation of former US ambassadors and high-level officials, who remain key figures in the American foreign policy establishment, are traveling to Ukraine to reiterate that support for Ukraine remains strong in the United States despite the US impeachment process.

Press Release by Atlantic Council

Politics & Diplomacy Ukraine

Ambassador Alexander “Sandy” Vershbow is a distinguished fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security. Ambassador Vershbow was the deputy secretary general of NATO from February 2012 to October 2016.

Prior to his post at NATO, Ambassador Vershbow served for three years as the US assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs. In that position, he was responsible for coordinating US security and defense policies relating to the nations and international organizations of Europe (including NATO), the Middle East, and Africa.

From 1977 to 2008, Vershbow was a career member of the United States Foreign Service. He served as US ambassador to NATO (1998-2001); to the Russian Federation (2001-05); and to the Republic of Korea (2005-08). He held numerous senior positions in Washington, including special assistant to the president and senior director for European affairs at the National Security Council (1994-97) and State Department director for Soviet Union affairs (1988-91). During his career, he was centrally involved in strengthening US defense relations with allies in Europe and Asia and in transforming NATO and other European security organizations to meet post-Cold War challenges. He also was involved in efforts to support democracy and human rights in the former Soviet Union.