Africa

  • Financial Pressure Needed to Prevent Financial Crimes in the DRC

    Financial pressure on authoritarian governments, such as that of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), must form the bedrock of US peacekeeping efforts, John Prendergast, co-founder of The Sentry and founding director of the Enough Project, said at the Atlantic Council.

    Increased consequences for government corruption and humanitarian atrocities are brought to bear “through the tools of financial pressure that are used when the United States is serious about a policy issue,” said Prendergast. Such measures can be seen in Washington’s dealings with Iran and North Korea. In regions such as the DRC, “by far the deadliest warzone in the world since World War II,” according to Prendergast, “conventional tools of diplomacy and crisis response are simply inadequate.”

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  • Disrupting Illicit Financial Flows in Congo

    On Thursday, October 19, the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center, in collaboration with The Sentry at the Enough Project, hosted a discussion on illicit financial flows in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), occasioned by the release of the group’s new report: The Terrorist’s Treasury

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  • Pham Joins WNYC to Discuss Somalia's Threatened Stability


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  • Bronwyn Quoted in Business Daily on Recent Bomb Attacks in Mogadishu


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  • Roundtable with Nigerien Tuareg Leader

    On Tuesday, October 17, the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center hosted Dr. Adal Ag Rhoubeid, President of the Movement for Democratic Renewal (MDR) Tarna, for a private roundtable discussion on the security situation in Niger and the broader Sahel region.
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  • Bruton Joins TBS eFM to Discuss Implications of Somali Terror Attack


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  • In Somalia, Bombings Highlight Limits of US Military Assistance

    The deadly bombings in Mogadishu, attributed to, yet not claimed by al-Shabaab, highlight the need for a new strategy from both US forces and the Somali government to counter violent extremism as militant groups adapt to increased US military action, according to an Atlantic Council analyst.

    “The weekend’s attacks highlight the limits of the military assistance [that the Somali government] has received,” said J. Peter Pham, vice president and director of the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center. “As the enemy has shifted, so too must the emphasis now move to building up police and intelligence capacities.”

    However, this is not a call for an increased US role in Somali state-building. “We need to recognize that what we can realistically do is minimize the threat that al-Shabaab and other militants can pose to regional security,” said Pham, adding: “What we cannot do is make Somalia ‘work’—only Somalis can do that.”

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  • Pham Quoted in WRAL.com on Feared Renewed Al-Shabab Onslaught in Somalia


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  • Pham Quoted in ABC News on Bombing in Somalia


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  • Negotiating Democracy and Security in Kenya

    On Monday, October 16, the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center, in collaboration with the International Republican Institute (IRI), hosted Ambassador Martin Kimani, director of Kenya’s National Counter Terrorism Centre and special envoy for countering violent extremism, and Dr. Korir Sing’Oei, legal adviser in the executive office of the deputy president of Kenya, for a private roundtable discussion on the security situation in Kenya amid its unprecedented and ongoing electoral crisis.


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