Africa

  • The United States Should Not Get Involved in Libya’s Civil War

    An unmistakable sense of despair and gloom accompanies most news reports and literature on the state of affairs in Libya after 2011. The Arab Spring was meant to usher in a period of unprecedented change after decades of notoriously undemocratic leadership across the Middle East and North Africa. Yet, seven years later, there has been very little positive development in terms of transparency, accountability, and inclusivity in the Arab world. No Arab Spring country, however, has fared worse than Libya, whose revolt, ironically, was more of a NATO-supported war than a genuine home-grown revolution with protracted battles which have essentially torn the oil-rich North African nation to shreds.

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  • Bruton Joins BBC to Discuss Eritrea Sanctions


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  • Libya, the US, and the Palermo Conference

    Key Libyan and international stakeholders will meet in Palermo, Italy, on November 12 to discuss and, hypothetically, draft a plan to deal with the political crisis in Libya. Main Libyan actors from the east—strongman Khalifa Haftar and president of the House of Representatives (HoR), Ageela Salah—as well as the west—prime minister of the United Nations (UN)-backed Government of National Accord (GNA), Fayez al-Serraj, and head of the High State Council, Khalid al-Mishri—are supposed to attend. The heads of state of the United States, France, Germany, and Russia have been invited: none have confirmed their attendance. The United States should send Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

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  • The Unknowns of the Libya Stabilization Conference

    The approaching conference on Libyan stabilization hosted by Italy—which will be held on November 12 and 13 in Palermo—will bring together the main Libyan leaders, with the purpose of defining their respective negotiation platforms in advance. Italy must not only navigate the components of Libya's heterogeneous and conflicting political landscape, but also host the most relevant regional and global actors.

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  • Roundtable with Sudan’s Minister of Foreign Affairs

    On November 7, the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center hosted a roundtable discussion featuring H.E. Dr. ElDirdiri Mohamed Ahmed, minister of foreign affairs of the Republic of Sudan, on the state of US-Sudan relations, as well as recent efforts by his government to mediate peace in South Sudan and the Central African Republic.

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  • The End—or Not—of Tunisia’s “Mut’ah”?

    Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi announced in September the official end to the alliance between Nidaa Tounes Ennahda that had been holding on since February 2015. Termed a “mut'ah”—a temporary marriage of traditional Shia origin—by Tunisia expert Dr. Monica Marks, it was a marriage of convenience between the two main parliamentary parties to preserve stability and to focus on counterterrorism, improving the economy, and government efficiency during the critical transitional period following the ousting of former President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali in 2011.

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  • Sudan's Security Services Target Refugees in Cairo

    When Sudan’s government was bombing hospitals in one of its own states in 2011, Kareem was among the activists detailing the atrocities. His work tracking the counterinsurgency in South Kordofan made him a target for Sudan’s security services, and in December 2012 he was accosted by two men who sprayed him with a nerve agent that put him in the hospital.

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  • #ElectionTracker: No, the United States Isn't the Only Country Getting Ready To Vote

    Scan the headlines these days and you would be forgiven for thinking that the United States is the only country preparing for an important election. As seemingly all attention focuses on voters from the Atlantic to the Pacific don’t lose sight of some other contests around the world. Here is a look at the races we are watching in the runup to the US midterms.

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  • Pham Quoted in Vox on Administration’s Weak Response to DRC Crisis


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  • Congo’s Conflict Gold Trade: Recent Findings and Recommendations for the Future

    On October 24, the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center partnered with The Sentry at the Enough Project to host a discussion on the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)’s conflict gold trade, occasioned by the release of the group’s new report: The Golden Laundromat.

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