Latin America

  • Key Takeaways from Brazilian President's Visit to Washington

    Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s choice of the United States for his first official international visit as president did not come as a surprise given his vocal desire to reposition Brazil closer to the United States and his admiration for US President Donald J. Trump.

    Bolsonaro was joined on his March 18-19 visit by six of his twenty-two ministers, including Economy Minister Paulo Guedes, Justice Minister Sérgio Moro, and Foreign Minister Ernesto Araújo. The Brazilians had a clear agenda: expand and deepen the areas of cooperation between the two largest economies in the Western hemisphere and gain the support Brazil needs to further attract trade and foreign direct investment.


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  • Venezuela’s Interim Government Unveils Reconstruction Plan

    Representatives of Venezuela’s interim government, at the Atlantic Council in Washington on March 14, unveiled their plan for the reconstruction of their country, which has for months been mired in a worsening humanitarian, political, and economic crisis.


    Daniel Sierra, a public policy adviser for Venezuela’s interim government, said that the plan—Plan País—will focus on resolving five key challenges: the humanitarian crisis, rebuilding the economy, regaining security and the rule of law, restoring public services and utilities, and strengthening the institutional capacity of the state after years of political purges by the regimes of Nicolás Maduro and his predecessor Hugo Chavez.


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  • Plan País: Building the New Venezuela - A Roadmap for Reconstruction

    On Thursday, March 14, 2019, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center convened distinguished experts and international leaders to discuss the crisis in Venezuela, as well as next steps in rebuilding the country’s economy, infrastructure, and institutions. The event served as the official unveiling of Plan País—the Venezuelan National Assembly’s detailed plan for reconstruction—on the international stage.


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  • Trump’s New Cuba Policy Threatens to Reignite Historic Disagreement With Key Allies

    The Trump administration broke another policy precedent with its March 4 decision to activate a decades-old US law on Cuba, ostensibly to punish Cuba for propping up Nicolás Maduro’s regime in Venezuela and for its ongoing suppression of human rights, as well as to put additional pressure on Maduro to step down. The unilateral policy decision threatens to further antagonize key US allies, particularly the European Union (EU) and Canada—both of whom have otherwise been largely consistent with the Trump administration on Venezuela policy—while likely stopping short of achieving the desired impacts on Havana and Caracas.

    For the first time since enactment of the 1996 Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (Libertad) Act, the Trump administration is allowing lawsuits to be brought in US courts under Title III of this law. Title III allows US nationals whose property in Cuba was confiscated by the Castro regime following the 1959 Cuban revolution to bring federal court actions against foreign entities “trafficking” in (i.e. using) those properties. Title III has never been used, as every president since the law’s passage has suspended it. The main rationale for this consistently bipartisan approach was that it would have negative repercussions on allies and partners.


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  • Wald joins Bloomberg Radio to discuss oil markets, Venezuela, and Saudi Aramco


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  • Tufro in Miami Herald: Guaidó should appeal to the U.N. to get help deliver aid to desperate Venezuelans


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  • Open for Business: A New Chapter for US-Brazil Relations?

    Previewing President Bolsonaro’s first official visit to the United States, the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted the public event “Open for Business: A New Chapter for US-Brazil Relations?” on February 28. Roberta Braga, associate director at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, moderated the discussion between Murillo de Aragão, founder and CEO of Arko Advice, Renata Vargas Amaral, founder and president of Women Inside Trade Association and director of international trade at Barral M. Jorge and Associates, and Ambassador Anthony S. Harrington, former US ambassador to Brazil and chair of Albright Stonebridge Group’s Managing Board.


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  • Rapid Reaction Conference Call: Update on Humanitarian Delivery

    On Monday February 25, the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center held a rapid reaction conference call addressing the developments in Venezuela and the potential next steps for the interim government of President Juan Guaidó. The conversation included the following participants: José Manuel Olivares,Representative for the State of Vargas in the Venezuelan National Assembly; Jason Marczak, Director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center; and Diego Area,Associate Director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.


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  • Marczak joins BBC to discuss Venezuela aid convoy and ongoing developments


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  • In Venezuela, Maduro and Guaidó are on a Collision Course Over Humanitarian Aid

    The crisis in Venezuela is heading toward a showdown between Nicolás Maduro’s regime and the US-backed opposition, led by Juan Guaidó, this weekend.


    Here’s a quick look at what’s going on:


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