Pakistan

  • Saudi-Led Coalition Setting Up Mobile Force to Fight Terrorism

    A Saudi-led coalition force of 41 countries is now taking shape and has found a focus: protecting member nations against the threat from Islamic State
    Read More
  • Russia’s Support for the Taliban Leaves Kabul Feeling Uneasy

    Afghan foreign minister sees threat to peace process

    Russia’s support for the Taliban—a terrorist group with which the United States has been at war for more than fifteen years and that is dedicated to overthrowing Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s government—is causing considerable unease in Afghanistan where officials worry it will undermine efforts to make peace in their war-torn country.

    “[E]stablishing contacts with these terrorist groups will give them a wrong message and they will think that the international community is recognizing them,” said Salahuddin Rabbani, Afghanistan’s foreign minister and a former head of the country’s High Peace Council. This, in turn, would undercut a peace and reconciliation process because the Taliban “will not be encouraged to come to the negotiating table,” he added.

    The peace process has had scant success in part because, as Rabbani noted, Afghanistan’s eastern neighbor, Pakistan, continues to provide material support and sanctuary for the terrorists.

    Read More
  • Ahmad in the Wall Street Journal: To Save Afghanistan, Put Pressure on Pakistan


    Read More
  • An Opportunity for Regional Leadership in South Asia

    US President Donald Trump’s likely hands-off policy toward South Asia may provide an opportunity for Pakistan and India to address longstanding disputes and reap the long-awaited benefits of cooperation.

    While there is significant uncertainty about the next four years of US diplomacy, it is unlikely that Trump will succeed where so many before him failed. As he may not solve the serious security, economic, and environmental problems confronting South Asia, it is time for the region to solve these problems on its own.   

    Read More
  • Gopalaswamy Quoted by CNBC on the Possible Alignment of Pakistan with China and Russia


    Read More
  • Dispute in Focus: Pakistan’s Perspective on Kashmir

    On October 5, 2016 the South Asia Center hosted Senator Mushahid Hussain Syed from the Senate of Pakistan and Dr. Shezra Mansab Khan, a member of the National Assembly of Pakistan, for a discussion on Pakistan’s perspective on the current political situation surrounding Kashmir. This conversation was moderated by the Director of the South Asia Center, Dr. Bharath Gopalaswamy. This visit occurs against the backdrop of the recent upsurge of violence in Jammu & Kashmir.


    Read More
  • A Conversation with Dr. Sannia Abdullah on Pakistan’s Full Spectrum Deterrence

    On September 21, 2016 the South Asia Center hosted Dr. Sannia Abdullah, a visiting scholar at Sandia National Labs, for a conversation on Pakistan’s full spectrum deterrence strategy. The discussion was moderated by Distinguished Fellow Mr. Shuja Nawaz.

    Dr. Abdullah addressed the overarching security calculus upon which Pakistan’s nuclear force posture and stated nuclear doctrines are based. However, as Dr. Abdullah noted, the stated postures and polices are fluid. “With situation change, there is policy change,” Dr. Abdullah repeated throughout her presentation. Dr. Abdullah explained that Pakistan’s belief that “ambiguity strengthens deterrence” allows the country to have more response options, but also raises the potential for uncontrolled escalation during a crisis. Dr. Abdullah concluded her remarks by stating, “Full spectrum deterrence aims to upscale the risk of violence at all levels of war – to dissuade aggression.”

    Read More
  • Pintak in Foreign Policy: Can Cartoons Save Pakistan’s Children From Jihad?


    Read More
  • Atlantic Council Board Member and Former Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz Interviewed by the World Post on Why China’s New Silk Road May Be A Game-Changer For Pakistan


    Read More
  • India and the NSG: Unfinished Business

    This article is part of a series.

    The Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) plenary meeting in Seoul ended on June 24 without resolving India’s request to join the group. The final statement issued at the conclusion of the meeting lacked an explicit reference to India’s application to join or an outline for a future course of action. With the exceptional waiver granted by the NSG to India in 2008, membership in the group should have been a relatively straightforward decision. However, larger geopolitical factors contributed to the stalemate.

    Read More