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Experts

Content

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

Technology for good

By focusing on healthcare, food security and agriculture, education, or infrastructure, global AI competition could be given a very different spin, mitigating the rivalry aspect of politics. How modern technologies should be centered on serving those broader global interests was at the core of the discussions in the roundtable focused on Africa.

GeoTech Cues by Mathew J. Burrows, Julian Mueller-Kaler

Africa China

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

A bipolar world

A Bipolar World is where Sino-US competition edges out any possibility of cooperation—not just on data and AI. Countries in Europe and Asia are forced to choose between Washington and Beijing while desperately trying to develop their own digital sovereignty.

GeoTech Cues by Mathew J. Burrows, Julian Mueller-Kaler

Africa China

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

A multilateral resurgence

A multilateral resurgence is a world that evolves after significant Sino-US confrontations occur on the scale of the 1963 Cuban Missile Crisis. Post-pandemic, both the United States and China step back from the precipice, realizing that their unrestrained, full-spectrum competition with one another could lead to disaster and mutual destruction.

GeoTech Cues by Mathew J. Burrows, Julian Mueller-Kaler

Africa Americas

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

Third parties don’t want to choose sides

Many worry about what could follow Pax Americana, especially since providing global security has always been a costly endeavor. A European Union (EU) approach was that Europe could serve as a bridge between the United States and China, somehow mitigating the ever-intensifying rivalry.

GeoTech Cues by Mathew J. Burrows, Julian Mueller-Kaler

Africa China

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

Smart partnerships for global challenges

In order to give the global AI competition a different spin and emphasize the “technology for good” approach, it would be wise to highlight organizations that focus on AI applications in healthcare, education, food security and agriculture, or infrastructure endeavors, particularly in a post-Covid-19 recovery.

GeoTech Cues by Mathew J. Burrows, Julian Mueller-Kaler

Africa China

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

Europe’s hurdles

Economists and technologists worried about Europe’s ability to reconcile privacy restrictions with a thriving tech economy. The logic is simple: In order to keep up, companies must be able to train AI systems with accessible data, which is why the EU has become more attuned to the need to facilitate data flows.

GeoTech Cues by Mathew J. Burrows, Julian Mueller-Kaler

China Cybersecurity

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

China’s ambiguity

Speaking more broadly, interlocutors in Beijing emphasized that international cooperation has always been important to China’s economic development, alluding to the fact that the most successful innovations and AI advances often come from international research collaborations.

GeoTech Cues by Mathew J. Burrows, Julian Mueller-Kaler

Africa China

Tue, Jan 12, 2021

Build an Atlantic-Pacific partnership: NATO 20/2020 podcast

NATO is the only institution capable of organizing transatlantic and transpacific stakeholders to address China’s political, military, and information threats.

NATO 20/2020 by Transatlantic Security Initative

Australia China

Fri, Jan 8, 2021

Kroenig and Ashford discuss the health of American democracy

On January 8, Foreign Policy published a biweekly column featuring Scowcroft Center deputy director Matthew Kroenig and New American Engagement Initiative senior fellow Emma Ashford discussing the latest news in international affairs. In this column, they discuss the invasion of the US Capitol and its effects on US diplomatic goals in Europe and China, the future of the […]

In the News by Atlantic Council

China Civil Society

Tue, Jan 5, 2021

How much money is the G20 spending?

Our new fiscal firepower heat map, updated through December, shows how G20 COVID-19 crisis spending now compares to the Global Financial Crisis. While nearly every country is deploying its fiscal firepower significantly more than a decade ago, China is still spending less.

EconoGraphics by GeoEconomics Center

China Economy & Business
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