Anna Wieslander

  • Strong Support for the EU in Sweden Ahead of European Elections

    This article is part of a series on the 2019 European Union parliamentary elections.

    Support for the European Union (EU) remains high in Sweden. Recent polls show that while 65 percent of Swedes support EU membership, only 19 percent would like Sweden to leave the Union. As a result of this strong public support, Sweden’s two most Eurosceptic parties, the Left Party (part of the European United Left/Nordic Green Left or GUE/NGL group in the European Parliament) and the Swedish Democrats (part of the European Conservatives and Reformists  or ECR group in the European Parliament), have abandoned their demand that Sweden ought to leave the EU, instead saying that they would work from inside the Union to shift it in their desired direction.


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  • What Makes an Ally? Sweden and Finland as NATO Partners

    When NATO kicked off Trident Juncture, its largest collective defense exercise in decades in Norway in October 2018, militarily non-aligned Sweden and Finland not only contributed substantial troops, they were actively involved in planning the exercise from the start.


    Over the years, Sweden and Finland have moved closer to NATO, more so than any other Alliance partner, in order to meet the challenge of defending the Baltics. In 2014, Ukraine, also a NATO partner, came to the realization that there is a red line between the Alliance’s partners and allies when it comes to collective defense. For Sweden and Finland that red line may be more of a gray zone.


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  • Seminar on Fighting Disinformation by Democratic Means

    On March 28, 2019, the Atlantic Council Northern Europe Office in collaboration with the U.S Embassy in Stockholm, organized a day seminar on 'Resistance and Resilience: Fighting Disinformation by Democratic Means.' The seminar brought together journalists, academic experts, civil society and representatives of government and organizations to discuss the challenge presented by disinformation and different ways to improve resilience ahead of a string of elections in Europe during 2019.


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  • Seminar on ‘Disinformation in Electoral Contexts’

    On 19 February the Atlantic Council in cooperation with the Embassy of Sweden in Vilnius organized a seminar on the threats of disinformation in electoral contexts. Information influence campaigns presenting challenges or threats to public elections are an increasing concern in Sweden, Lithuania and the rest of the EU.

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  • Conference on the European Defence and Security Dimension in Northern Europe

    On December 11, 2018, the Atlantic Council Northern Europe Office and the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, in collaboration with the Latvian Embassy in Sweden, organized a high-level, public international conference on ’The European Defence and Security Dimension in Northern Europe’. The conference brought together policy experts, academic researchers, representatives of government and organizations and media from a significant number of countries. 


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  • Seminar on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of NATO

    On December 6 the Atlantic Council Northern Europe Office, in cooperation with the Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Stockholm, organized a seminar titled ”NATO at 70: How to Navigate in A Turbulent World”. The seminar was attended by experts representing both Swedish governmental institutions, the Stockholm diplomatic corps, and think-tanks. 


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  • Wieslander Joins Brussels Sprouts to Discuss Swedish Elections


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  • Wieslander in Svenska Dagbladet: Increased Pressure in European Defence Cooperation


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  • Will Sweden's Elections Lead to NATO Membership?

    The Swedish elections on September 9 could set the country on a path to joining NATO as a full member. Opinion polls do not show a clear winner in the elections. Neither the center-left Red-Green coalition government, that has run the country for the past four years, nor the main opposition center-right bloc has a commanding lead. However, if the four-party opposition bloc—consisting of the Conservatives, the Liberals, the Center Party, and the Christian Democrats—wins it will likely steer Sweden toward NATO membership.

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  • Wieslander Quoted in The Atlantic on the Significance of Finland in US-Russia Relations


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