Shaping the post-COVID-19 world together

Tue, Jul 7, 2020

What world post-COVID-19? Three scenarios

This paper is a preliminary look at the geopolitical implications of the COVID-19 pandemic and sketches three scenarios for the possible direction of the global system post-COVID-19.

In-Depth Research & Reports by Mathew J. Burrows, Peter Engelke

Coronavirus G20
Learn more
about the series:

Shaping the post-COVID-19 world together
Scenario 1:
Great accelerator downwards
Scenario 2:
China first
Scenario 3:
New Renaissance

Featured commentary and analysis

The Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security works to develop sustainable, nonpartisan strategies to address the most important security challenges facing the United States and the world.

Content

Wed, Jul 29, 2020

Fighting COVID-19 with surveillance: Perspectives from across the globe

As more countries rely on digital tools to contain the spread of COVID-19, how will enhanced surveillance challenge privacy norms in the future? According to the World Health Organization, public health surveillance is critical to containing the pandemic. However, can enhanced surveillance during a public health crisis set precedents for digital surveillance in the future?

New Atlanticist by Simon Handler and Lily Liu

Africa Coronavirus

Wed, Jul 29, 2020

What World Post COVID-19?: A Conversation with Dr. Joe Mascaro

Dr. Joe Mascaro, director of education and research at Planet, discusses the effects of the pandemic on the environment, and its implications for energy transitions and earth sciences research.

Blog Post by Foresight, Strategy, and Risks Initiative

Climate Change & Climate Action Coronavirus

Tue, Jul 28, 2020

Preble and Burrows in Responsible Statecraft: COVID-19 and the health of the global order

Even as the United States struggles with the disease, some countries’ relative success reveals the resilience of the global system.

In the News

Coronavirus Politics & Diplomacy

Tue, Jul 28, 2020

Singapore’s prime minister has a message for the US: Don’t choose China confrontation or Asia withdrawal

Lee Hsien Loong, the prime minister of Singapore, worries that Washington’s increasingly tense relationship with Beijing and domestic pressures to reduce its commitments abroad will force US policymakers to choose either a path of “colliding with China” or “deciding that you have no stake in the region and leave us to our own defenses.”

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

China Coronavirus

Thu, Jul 23, 2020

What World Post COVID-19?: A Conversation with Mr. Greg Lindsay

Greg Lindsay, director of applied research at NewCities, outlines the implications of the pandemic for the future of cities and shares suggestions for how communities could emerge from this crisis stronger than before.

Blog Post by Foresight, Strategy, and Risks Initiative

Civil Society Climate Change & Climate Action

Mon, Jul 20, 2020

Manning in The National Interest: Coronavirus Meets Donald Trump’s Wonderland: What the Facemask Wars Reveal

In the News by Atlantic Council

Coronavirus Politics & Diplomacy

Mon, Jul 20, 2020

What World Post COVID-19?: A Conversation with Dr. Kim Roberts

Dr. Kim Roberts, security studies expert, discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed thinking around national security and the US role in the world, and outlines the uncertainties ahead.

Blog Post by Anca Agachi, Peter Engelke, Kim Roberts

China Coronavirus

Thu, Jul 9, 2020

Christopher Preble co-hosts Net Assessment podcast episode on COVID-19 and US global leadership

In the News by Atlantic Council

Australia China

Wed, Jul 8, 2020

Manning quoted in Axios on COVID-19, trade, and disruptive technology

Addressing developments related to the coronavirus, this Axios Future article references Robert Manning's two recent Atlantic Council reports on the fragmentation of global trade and the challenges wrought by emerging technology.

In the News by Atlantic Council

China Coronavirus

Tue, Jul 7, 2020

White House’s Birx: China’s delay in sharing COVID-19 information hampered international responses

The White House’s lead coronavirus-response coordinator has criticized Chinese officials for a “delay in information” on the outbreak of the virus in January, which she argued hampered the ability of other countries to respond effectively to the pandemic.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

China Coronavirus