Eurasia

  • The Changing Face of Kremlin Propaganda

    On May 23, 2016, the Atlantic Council’s Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center, along with IREX and the Free Russia Foundation, hosted a paneled event discussing the nature of modern Russian propaganda.

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  • One Year Later, Ukraine’s Patrol Police Enjoy Massive Spike in Trust

    If one were to merely follow national politics in Ukraine, it would be easy to become discouraged about the state of reforms. Headlines from top media suggest that Ukraine’s longstanding oligarchic power structures and institutionalized corruption have persisted in the wake of the Revolution of Dignity, frustrating citizens and the international community. Indeed, the many criticisms of President Petro Poroshenko and parliament are not unfounded.

    A recent national survey conducted by the International Republican Institute (IRI) found record-level public dissatisfaction regarding the country’s overall direction—a level of frustration that rivals the pre-Maidan period. Seventy-six percent of Ukrainians told pollsters the country was headed in the wrong direction in February 2016. Similarly, as previously reported, IRI’s March 2016 nationwide municipal survey, which contains the perceptions of more than 19,000 Ukrainians from twenty-four major cities, revealed that more than 90 percent of Ukrainians believe corruption is a significant or serious problem in their community, and frustration with Poroshenko and the parliament stands at troubling levels.

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  • "Solved?": Investigating Boris Nemtsov’s Murder

    One year after the public assassination of Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, the head of Russia’s Investigative Committee, General Alexander Bastrykin, has announced that the case has been “solved.” However, the legitimacy of the investigation is questionable as the Investigative Committee has refused to qualify Nemtsov’s murder under Article 277 of the Criminal Code as “an attempt on the life of a public statesman.” Additionally, neither the organizers, nor the masterminds, of the most high-profile political assassination in Russia’s modern history have been named. As prosecutors prepare for a trial at the Moscow District Military Court, only the alleged perpetrators have been arrested, and despite the obvious links between the gunmen and Ramzan Kadyrov, the Kremlin-appointed Chechen leader has not been formally questioned in this case. 

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  • A Threat to National Security

    “People in Russia Prefer not to talk about Kadyrov,” said Ilya Yashin,Deputy Chairman People’s Freedom Party (PARNAS), at the Atlantic Council on March 24, 2016. Mr. Yashin is seeking to break that taboo with his new report, “A Threat to National Security.” The report paints a terrifying portrait of the Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov and his totalitarian control of the small Caucasus region.

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  • Ukraine and Turkey’s Newly Strengthened Relationship

    Turkey and Ukraine, including Crimea, control 71 percent of the Black Sea coast between the two of them. With Ukraine to the north and Turkey directly to the south, the two nations have long been collegial when working together on regional problems, but their reasonably friendly relationship has generally been subordinated to more pressing issues. Now, Russia’s actions in Crimea, the Donbas, and more recently in Syria have given a greater urgency to the development of the Ukrainian-Turkish relationship.

    For many of the past fifteen years—the duration of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's tenure—the country has focused most of its diplomatic and trade energies on two key areas. First, as the successor state to last Islamic caliphate, Erdogan's Turkey has taken upon itself the mantle of leadership in the Middle East. Second, Turkey has continued to pursue its dreams of European integration. Meanwhile, Ukraine’s foreign policy interests were focused on balancing its European aspirations against its much deeper and more demanding ties with Russia.

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  • Confronting Far-Right Extremism in Europe

    The Atlantic Council hosted a discussion on the rise and threat of far-right populism in Europe, featuring the release of a new policy brief on the topic, What’s Left of Europe If the Far Right Has Its Way? by Alina Polyakova and Anton Shekhovtsov.

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  • REPORT LAUNCH: Securing Ukraine’s Energy Sector

    On April 4, 2016, the Atlantic Council’s Eurasian Energy Futures Initiative launched a report, Securing Ukraine’s Energy Sector, authored by Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center’s Resident Senior Fellow, Anders Åslund.

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  • Russian Court Finds Ukraine’s Defiant Pilot Savchenko Guilty

    Nothing in the Nadiya Savchenko case has been easy or fast. The famed Ukrainian pilot whom Russia has charged with complicity in the deaths of two Russian journalists can’t even get a quick verdict at the end of a trial that has lasted nine months.

    On March 22, the court found Savchenko guilty of all charges and sentenced her to twenty-two years in prison.

    The verdict was a foregone conclusion. The prosecution had asked for a twenty-three year sentence and there was little doubt that she would be given any leniency. But even for this she had to wait two days. The first day of the reading of the verdict began on March 21 and lasted nearly eight hours.

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  • Can Minsk Deliver a Sustainable Peace?

    Is the Minsk process salvageable?

    Twelve experts gathered at the Atlantic Council in Washington, DC, on March 17 to debate whether the Minsk ceasefire can deliver a sustainable peace in Ukraine. The war in Ukraine has claimed over 10,000 lives and displaced more than 1.6 million people.

    The Minsk accords, signed in 2014 and 2015, have remained the guiding principles for the peace process in eastern Ukraine. According to the Minsk agreements, Ukraine must hold elections in the Donbas in line with international standards and include a constitutional provision for special status for the so-called “People’s Republics.”

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  • Event Recap: Can Minsk Deliver a Sustainable Peace?

    Is the Minsk process salvageable?

    Twelve experts gathered at the Atlantic Council in Washington, DC, on March 17 to debate whether the Minsk ceasefire can deliver a sustainable peace in Ukraine. The war in Ukraine has claimed over 10,000 lives and displaced more than 1.6 million people.

    The Minsk accords, signed in 2014 and 2015, have remained the guiding principles for the peace process in eastern Ukraine. According to the Minsk agreements, Ukraine must hold elections in the Donbas in line with international standards and include a constitutional provision for special status for the so-called “People’s Republics.”

    Read More