Eurasia

  • #ACExplainer: Russia's Interference in the United States Elections


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  • Central Asia Summit Establishes Core Initiatives to Enhance Regional Cooperation

    It was little noticed, but something of real significance took place in Washington during the first week of August. US Secretary of State John Kerry hosted the Foreign Ministers of five Central Asian nations that emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. With the US largely out of the war in Afghanistan, Central Asia receives little attention from the American media or public. But, this region sits at the very center of the Eurasian land mass, bordered by Russia, China, and Iran and near India and Pakistan. Stability in Central Asia is critical for stability throughout Eurasia.

    Kerry’s meeting on August 3 in Washington with Foreign Ministers Abdyldayev representing Kyrgzstan, Aslov of Tajikistan, Idrissov of Kazakhstan, Komilov of Uzbekistan, and Meredov of Turkmenistan is the second convening of this group. The first occurred in the fall of 2015 in the fabled city of Samarkand during Kerry’s first trip to Central Asia. The group—known as the C5+1—is the brainchild of Necia Desai Biswal, assistant secretary of state for South and Central Asian affairs.  The group is a vehicle that promotes US cooperation with the five Central Asian states and cooperation among the states themselves.

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  • Grigas' 'Frozen Conflicts' Featured by Diplomatic Courier


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  • Foul Play: The Human Cost of World Sports

    Wednesday July 13, 2016, the Atlantic Council’s Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center hosted a panel of human rights experts to discuss the human rights violation which often accompany international mega sports events. The panelist included: Minky Worden, director of global initiatives at Human Rights Watch, Sunjeev Bery, advocacy director, Middle East and North Africa at Amnesty International, David Kramer, senior director for human rights and democracy at the The McCain Institute for International Leadership, and Pedro Abramovay, regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean and Director of the Latin America Program at Open Society Foundations. The event was moderated by Robert Herman, vice president of Emergency Assistance Programs and Multilateral Advocacy at Freedom House.

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  • Ukraine’s Humanitarian Crisis

    “People have forgotten that there’s a real humanitarian situation and a real need in a European country,” said Jock Mendoza-Wilson, director of international and investor relations at System Capital Management, during a recent Atlantic Council panel examining the crisis in Ukraine.

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  • The National Features Polyakova and Shekhovtsov: What's Left of Europe If the Far Right Has It's Way?


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  • The Changing Face of Kremlin Propaganda

    On May 23, 2016, the Atlantic Council’s Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center, along with IREX and the Free Russia Foundation, hosted a paneled event discussing the nature of modern Russian propaganda.

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  • One Year Later, Ukraine’s Patrol Police Enjoy Massive Spike in Trust

    If one were to merely follow national politics in Ukraine, it would be easy to become discouraged about the state of reforms. Headlines from top media suggest that Ukraine’s longstanding oligarchic power structures and institutionalized corruption have persisted in the wake of the Revolution of Dignity, frustrating citizens and the international community. Indeed, the many criticisms of President Petro Poroshenko and parliament are not unfounded.

    A recent national survey conducted by the International Republican Institute (IRI) found record-level public dissatisfaction regarding the country’s overall direction—a level of frustration that rivals the pre-Maidan period. Seventy-six percent of Ukrainians told pollsters the country was headed in the wrong direction in February 2016. Similarly, as previously reported, IRI’s March 2016 nationwide municipal survey, which contains the perceptions of more than 19,000 Ukrainians from twenty-four major cities, revealed that more than 90 percent of Ukrainians believe corruption is a significant or serious problem in their community, and frustration with Poroshenko and the parliament stands at troubling levels.

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  • "Solved?": Investigating Boris Nemtsov’s Murder

    One year after the public assassination of Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, the head of Russia’s Investigative Committee, General Alexander Bastrykin, has announced that the case has been “solved.” However, the legitimacy of the investigation is questionable as the Investigative Committee has refused to qualify Nemtsov’s murder under Article 277 of the Criminal Code as “an attempt on the life of a public statesman.” Additionally, neither the organizers, nor the masterminds, of the most high-profile political assassination in Russia’s modern history have been named. As prosecutors prepare for a trial at the Moscow District Military Court, only the alleged perpetrators have been arrested, and despite the obvious links between the gunmen and Ramzan Kadyrov, the Kremlin-appointed Chechen leader has not been formally questioned in this case. 

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  • A Threat to National Security

    “People in Russia Prefer not to talk about Kadyrov,” said Ilya Yashin,Deputy Chairman People’s Freedom Party (PARNAS), at the Atlantic Council on March 24, 2016. Mr. Yashin is seeking to break that taboo with his new report, “A Threat to National Security.” The report paints a terrifying portrait of the Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov and his totalitarian control of the small Caucasus region.

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